Airborne once more – and loving it!!

photo by Jerod Foster

After attaining my private pilots license in 1977, I flew a variety of planes for the next 12 years. During this time frame, I used a fixed wing aircraft for a variety of purposes, including aerial photography, working cattle for local ranchers, and basically terrorizing my friends who were so unfortunate to be caught in open country with no place to hide!

My favorite plane to fly was a 1940’s model Aeronca Champ, although I also flew a variety of others, including the typical 150s, 172s, and the older stuff, such as a PA-20. Even flew an open cockpit bi-wing aerobatic craft for a period of time. Recently, my good friend, Bob Moorhouse, offered me his plane to fly, and I took him up on checking out in his 1946 Model Aeronca Chief. After over 18 years of being grounded, I have once more taken to the sky!! I’ve been using the plane to augment my current book project shooting aerials and marking shooting locations by GPS.

Included here are some shots of the area around my home region taken from the cockpit of the venerable Chief! Enjoy!

Autumn on the Brazos

Badlands on the Wichita River

Autumn Sunset over Davis Lake - Knox County, Texas

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Published in: on November 22, 2008 at 4:13 am  Comments (7)  

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7 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Hi, Wyman. I never got on one of these things (blogs)before, so it’s a first for both of us. Congratulations on you book and blog. I envy your opportunities to get airborne and capture those fantastic shadows over the Texas “badlands”. Great stuff!

    Have a good Thanksgiving and keep up the great work,

    Larry

  2. Hey, there, Wyman. Thanks for letting the rest of us live a little of your dream. I continue to be amazed and awed at your beautiful work. You always make me proud to be from Knox County and the great Lone Star state.
    Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

  3. Hello Wyman,

    Thanks for the invitation! I’m going to love reading everything you’re willing to post in here. This way I can stay in touch with Texas, the country that has captured my heart and that I’ve come to love so much. The country that I still miss incredibly!!!
    Greetings from Holland and we wish you and your family Happy Thanksgiving!

    Inge.

  4. WARNING!!! THREAT LEVEL: HIGHEST POSSIBLE!!!

    Anyone living in any county where Wyman is flying should move all things beloved … spouses, children, grandchildren, parents, grandparents, pets, livestock, pickups, Model 70s, etc, etc, etc., valuables of any sort … to another county.

    The same consideration should be given if he’s driving through as well.

  5. I have enjoyed your photos for years, at times recognizing your work before even verifying its creator. Not to be confused with predictability, but quite the contrary-depth, color, richness…I could go on and on. Thank you for sharing your talent and more importantly sharing with the next generation of photographers. It is fitting that Graves’ writing is forever linked with your work. I look forward to receiving your latest hardback as well as frequenting your blog.

    jde

  6. Hey Wyman,
    Great to see you have a blog. Now I can keep up with your adventures on a regular basis. Thinking back on our days at Texas Tech back in the early 70s, I’m glad you didn’t have your pilot’s license then. You were a just little crazy back then (compared to today), and to think of you being in the air with a motorized vehicle, make me wonder if we’d all be here today.
    Press on…You are the one we look to find our boundaries.
    Stay healthy, my friend

  7. Thanks for sharing your work! Here’s a tribute for your lupine friend:

    “A lion shorn of his strength, an eagle robbed of his freedom, or a dove bereft of his mate, all die, it is said, of a broken heart; and who will aver that this grim bandit could bear the three-fold brunt, heart-whole? This only I know, that when the morning dawned, he was lying there still in his position of calm repose, his body unwounded, but his spirit was gone–the old kingwolf was dead.” — Ernest Thompson Seton, Wild Animals I Have Known


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